COURSE  DESCRIPTIONS

Click the course number or name below to learn more about the class. Please note this is not a full class list. We will add descriptions as we receive them. Click here for the full list of BA, MA, and MFA courses.

Course #

Course Name

Professor

Mode

Orenstein
Grodman
Cusick
Romano
Cusick
Ceesay
Williams
Krumholz
Bosch
Bosch
Moore
Foglia
Romano
Bosch
Thompson
Orenstein
Mosher
Grodman
Chatterjee
Scarfuto
Kalb
Online
Hybrid
Hybrid
Online
Online
Online
Online
Online
Online
Online
Hybrid
Online
Hybrid
Online
Online
Online
Online
Hybrid
Online
Online
Online
 

THEA 101 - Intro to Theatre Section 1

Professor Orenstein

NOTE: Students may have cameras off for the lecture classes. Lectures will also be recorded for later viewing for those who have issues attending synchronously.

HOWEVER, Students are also required to attend a smaller synchronous one-hour discussion section once a week (the 8 discussion sections meet at different times). Students need to be on camera for their discussion sections. Attendance is required and taken at discussion sections.

 

This course introduces you to the various elements that comprise the art of the theatre. We will look at the different jobs, forms of collaboration, and creative skills that go into creating theatrical performances. We will also consider how to read and analyze dramatic texts for production, and we will explore the different models and forms of theatre that exist around the world, the many ways they communicate with their audiences, the variety of subject they can address, and the various roles theatre plays in different historical and cultural contexts. Offering a broad overview of the art, from both the artist’s and the audience’s perspective, with opportunities for you to try your own hand at creative work, the course intends to make you a more knowledgeable and appreciative theatre-goer and perhaps inspire you to pursue your own creative path. No proctoring software used.

 

THEA 161 - Acting 1 Section 1

Professor Grodman

This is a course about acting: its technique, responsibilities, and possibilities. Students will develop the skills – through exercises, text work and discussions – to tell stories in dynamic, genuine and unique ways.

An actor is a storyteller; this course will cover the essential elements of storytelling. However this is not a traditionally academic class. Acting training is primarily an experiential process. Rather than relying solely on critical analysis, this course calls for students to take risks, play imaginatively and explore multiple possibilities in lieu of rushing to the comfort of a singular answer. 

 

Students will be working physically and imaginatively in every class. Through our exploration, students will learn how to listen/respond, how to create relationships, and how to bring their own perspective, instincts and experiences to their work. 

THEA 161 - Acting 1 Section 3

Professor Cusick

Basic Acting Techniques provides a general introduction to the vocabulary of the craft of acting as practiced in Western styles of theatre, as well as selected techniques designed to increase somatic awareness, imaginative identification, and emotional availability when approaching work on a character in a play, movie, or musical. Through solo assignments, improvisational work, and a final monologue presentation, students will gain an increased awareness of what it means to create living moments while on camera.

 

The class will be conducted entirely online. The first 10 weeks of the course will be entirely synchronous with the correct meeting times. The last 4 weeks will be primarily asynchronous, with students scheduling individual work times with me at their convenience. The final two classes of the semester for the regular Hunter sections and the final class of the College Now section will be synchronous with the correct meeting time. 

 

Please note, however, that since the class consists of students presenting exercises, it is sometimes difficult to state precisely when the synchronous portion will end, as some units take longer to complete than anticipated. There may be a week overlap period where the class is still meeting synchronously while some students are also meeting with me individually outside of regular class hours. Since I am not tracking attendance for online sessions, students will not be penalized if they are unable to attend a synchronous class that had been previously listed in the syllabus as asynchronous. Additionally, students are not required to have their cameras on while in class UNLESS they are presenting an exercise, improvisation, or prepared monologue or commenting on another student's work. This is essential because this is a performance class and physical presence and appearance is an intrinsic component of the art and craft of performance.

THEA 161 - Acting 1 Section 4

Professor Romano

The goal of this course is to provide students with fundamental skills used in the craft of Acting. Students will learn and develop practical skills and basic acting techniques to use in the rehearsal room. Through Games, Improvisation, Text Analysis, Voice and Movement exercises and an introduction to the techniques of Stanislavski, Hagen, Meisner, and Linklater this class will focus on the Actor’s work in the Theatre. We will also study the work of Actors on film and analyze these performances. This class will be Fully Online, Synchronous, and Students will be expected to have their Camera ON for class. 

 
 
 

THEA 161 - Acting 1 Section 6

Professor Cusick

Basic Acting Techniques provides a general introduction to the vocabulary of the craft of acting as practiced in Western styles of theatre, as well as selected techniques designed to increase somatic awareness, imaginative identification, and emotional availability when approaching work on a character in a play, movie, or musical. Through solo assignments, improvisational work, and a final monologue presentation, students will gain an increased awareness of what it means to create living moments while on camera.

 

The class will be conducted entirely online. The first 10 weeks of the course will be entirely synchronous with the correct meeting times. The last 4 weeks will be primarily asynchronous, with students scheduling individual work times with me at their convenience. The final two classes of the semester for the regular Hunter sections and the final class of the College Now section will be synchronous with the correct meeting time. 

 

Please note, however, that since the class consists of students presenting exercises, it is sometimes difficult to state precisely when the synchronous portion will end, as some units take longer to complete than anticipated. There may be a week overlap period where the class is still meeting synchronously while some students are also meeting with me individually outside of regular class hours. Since I am not tracking attendance for online sessions, students will not be penalized if they are unable to attend a synchronous class that had been previously listed in the syllabus as asynchronous. Additionally, students are not required to have their cameras on while in class UNLESS they are presenting an exercise, improvisation, or prepared monologue or commenting on another student's work. This is essential because this is a performance class and physical presence and appearance is an intrinsic component of the art and craft of performance.

 

THEA 161 - Acting 1 Section 7

Professor Ceesay

This course will introduce students to the fundamental elements of acting.  Through exercises incorporating storytelling, improvisation and scene work, students will learn how to listen and respond, how to make discoveries, and how to let their personal experiences inform their acting. We will apply acting techniques and find our own to prepare students for working in a rehearsal room. This course is entirely on Zoom and require student’s cameras to be on so that they can fully participate and engage with their peers.

 

THEA 215 - Black Theatre

Professor Williams

This course will give students the opportunity to explore the work of black playwights of the past and present.  The course will use scene work, readings, research, and design projects to explore the worlds of such playwrights as Alice Childress, James Baldwin, Lynn Nottage, Dominique Morriaeau, August Wilson, Ebony Boothe and more. 

 

THEA 251 - Theatre Production

Professor Krumholz

This fully online, synchronous course introduces students to the practical aspects of theatre production through a combination of readings, discussions, guests, and hands-on experience. Students learn what goes into making a play from the perspective of the producer, from auditions and casting to budgeting and hiring personnel to marketing, teching, and presenting the final production. Class meetings will include lectures, discussions, and visits from Theatre Department faculty, staff, and student guests. A primary component of this class is that we are responsible for making sure that the departmental production CoLab is of the highest artistic quality, is ready on time, and runs smoothly. We are also responsible for the creation of the CoLab website, although no prior experience with web design is required.

 

Since students must be present in order to participate in this highly collaborative class, grades will depend largely on the level and quality of presence in our online Zoom sessions, for which students must be visible via camera and audible via microphone. If students are unable to participate in class meetings or crew calls and do not have a legitimate medical excuse, final grades for this class will be reduced accordingly.

THEA 261 - Acting 2 Section 2

Professor Bosch

This course is designed as a continued exploration of the craft of Acting. We will focus on American Realism.  Skills will be developed through the use of ensemble exercises, observation and concentration work, and vocal and physical exercises. Scene work will include analyzing, understanding and creating a character, sustaining belief in ones actions, interpreting a text through methodical script analysis, learning acting vocabulary and the basic  principles of rehearsal.   

 

Though online, the course is taught in a professional laboratory environment, and discussion and full participation are needed.  You will need to be seen and heard!  Each student will work on two  monologues and one scene . We will do group or partner exercises as the technology allows.


You will  be responsible for a character  and scene  analysis  for each  project,  and  outsi de of  class  (online) rehearsals  are mandatory.

 
 

THEA 262 - Acting 3 Section 1

Professor Bosch

This course is designed as a continuation of the exploration of the craft of Acting. We will move beyond American realism to begin to deal with European texts. We will concentrate on the works of Chekhov and Ibsen. Scene work will include analyzing, understanding and creating a character, sustaining belief in one's actions, interpreting a text through methodical script analysis, learning acting vocabulary and more advanced principles of rehearsal. Particular attention will be given to exploring the sub-textual lines in the text. This course is taught in a professional laboratory environment, and discussion and full participation are needed. Each student will work on two monologues and one scene. You will be responsible for a written character and scene analysis for each project, and outside of class rehearsals (online) are mandatory. 

 

THEA 263 - Basic Voice & Movement

Professor Moore

Optimized for online learning, this course helps the performer develop authority, range, and freedom in their artistic work.  Using the Linklater approach, students learn how to release physical tensions and integrate their body, voice and creativity through exercises they can do in their own homes. Through text work students will develop their creative imagination and sharpen their articulation. By the end of this summer course students will have gained more artistic confidence and connection, and leave with a physical and vocal foundation for their rehearsal and performance work.

THEA 321 - Play Analysis

Professor Foglia

How does a director read a play? What about a designer? Or an actor? How do you get from text on the page to life on the stage? What does any of this have to do with a directorial "concept"? In this course, we will study plays both classical and modern and employ a variety of lenses to discover the reality these writers have created. The goal is to answer the questions we would face as artists en route to production.

THEA 365 - Screen Acting

Professor Romano

The goal of this course is to provide students with fundamental skills used in the craft of Acting for the Camera. The focus of the course work will be on the Actor’s approach to the Film and Television mediums. Through exercises and scene work students will develop practical skills and basic techniques to use on set and in audition settings. Students will learn to apply the techniques of Stanislavski, Meisner, and Uta Hagen to their work, learning how to analyze a text and apply tools such as the Moment-Before. We will also study the work of Actors on film and analyze these performances. This class will be Hybrid, Synchronous, and Students will be expected to have their camera ON for class.

THEA 371 - Directing

Professor Bosch

This is a laboratory directing class.  We will focus on the basics of directing :  Storytelling, text analysis, picturization, rhythm, focus, ground plans and all technical aspects of putting on a play.  You will learn how to work with actors and designers as collaborators.

Students will all explore two scenes during the semester from American Realism.  You will be responsible for two prompt books with extensive research and analysis.

 
 
 
 

THEA 381 - Scene Design

Professor Thompson

This class is an exploration of set/scene design for the theatre. Using critical thinking and creative expression, students will respond to texts by exploring the process through which sets are created. Students will explore the vocabulary of design by researching, sketching, model building, and drafting.  The critique discussion demands full participation.  Theatre is a collaborative medium and the verbal expression of ideas is equal to the visual presentation of projects. There will be visits from theatre professionals and required attendance at current productions.

 

Learning Outcomes:

Basic knowledge of drafting standards and model construction.

An understanding of text analysis for designers.

The ability to generate visual research for use in the design process.

The ability to write a “directorial approach”

The ability to use storyboarding and perspective rendering in the design process.

The ability to form a design concept for a production and express that concept visually.

An understanding of past and current approaches to scene design.

An understanding of spatial dynamics and basic theatre architecture.

THEA 397.18 - Traditional Japanese Theatre

Professor Orenstein

Students should be on camera for discussion portions of the class.

This course offers students the opportunity to spend the semester discovering the inspiring traditional performing arts of Japan through lectures, readings, videos, and possibly some hands-on workshops. Japanese theatre blends music and dance with poetry and dramatic texts and includes exquisite costuming and often the use of masks, extravagant make-up, and puppetry. We will begin with the roots of Japanese performance in early ritual, move on to forms such as bugaku, gigaku, and sarugaku, then to the flourishing traditions of noh, kyogen, kabuki, and bunraku, both in their traditional models and in contemporary adaptations. The course will include folk traditions and other puppetry forms, such as kuruma ningyō (cart puppetry) and the itinerant hakomawashi tradition. Intended for students in both Theatre and the Japanese Program, the course will combine scholarly and artistic approaches to appreciating Japanese performance.

Note: Students should be on camera for discussion portions of the class. No proctoring software used.

THEA 397.32 - Producing

Professor Mosher

The sub-title of Producing for this semester is Never Let a Crisis Go to Waste. It will be a practical, not a theoretical, course. At a moment when we’ve all been forced to abandon live theater, we’ll use our time together to examine how we might go about making the kind of theater <you> want to make and to see. We won’t ignore the past, or we’d just repeat mistakes and miss some good bits we might want to steal. But we most definitely will not be limited by that history. We’re looking toward the future, specifically your futures.

 

There will be a reasonably serious amount of reading for the course, often from innovators outside the theater. There will be just enough writing so that I know you’re doing that reading and following our class discussions, and that you’re thinking creatively about the subject we’re discussing.

We will work in teams to report back to the class, and to come up with ideas and plans. We’ll have guests from the industry, more likely from the younger experimental companies than from Broadway, but perhaps a few of the latter.

 

A few books we’ll be reading sections of:

Ignorance by Stuart Firestein

The Innovator’s Dilemma by Clayton Christiansen

The Black Swan by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Ensembles by Mark Larson

Connected by Nicholas Christakis

 

Format:

The course will meet synchronously.

The default setting is that your cameras will be on. (I understand you may occasionally need to turn it off briefly.)

THEA 397.32 - Acting on Camera

Prep, Set & Collaboration with Detectives

Professor Grodman

In this class actors will work, under the guidance of the professor, with directing students from the Hunter Film Department.  In addition to learning how to act on camera, each student will shoot up to 5 short films in collaboration with the directors.

Elements of the class include scene analysis, preparing to shoot, and working on a film/television set.  The class will cover everything from the audition (and self-tapes), to rehearsals, to shooting so students can experience each stage of production and the nature of the collaborative process. 

 
 
 
 

THEA 397.95 - Costume History

Professor Chatterjee

Costume History explores costume, clothing and fashion to understand society. This course delves into class, race, gender, performance, industry and technology, psychology and related areas to analyze these through the lens of clothing. How do clothes tell stories? How do styles travel across continents? What can be learned by focussing on clothes? These are some of the questions this multidisciplinary course will attempt to unpack.

 
 

THC 734 - Playwriting IV

Professor Scarfuto

This is a synchronous class and cameras are required to be on. This course is designed to prepare writers for the MFA Playwriting Festival, and for your life as a playwright beyond this class. We will read and analyze new plays, host a series of industry guests, and workshop your final thesis plays. The semester will culminate with a 29-hour workshop with a professional director and actors. 

THC 790 - Play Analysis

Professor Kalb

This 300 level course will unpack how costumes and fashion are part of the larger cultural industry and have influenced culture throughout time and space. This course will take students on a decolonial journey to understanding concepts of shape, color, form, proportion, taste, class, politics, history, and local and world cultures. It will introduce students to theoretical concepts such as post-colonial theory, Pan Africanism, consumerism and others that define costume and fashion. Students in media, film, theatre, art, anthropology, history and other arts and humanities departments will benefit from the course. 

Students will be need plain white paper, pencils, and a camera to submit occasional simple sketches. All other materials and assignments will be provided through Blackboard.