FALL 2022 COURSE  DESCRIPTIONS

Click the course number or name below to learn more about the class. Please note this is not a full class list. We will add descriptions as we receive them.

 

Click here for the full list of BA, MA and MFA courses.

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

In-Person (P) - All classes will take place in person.

Online (O) - All classes will take place online.

Hybrid (H) - Hybrid can mean a variety of different things depending on the professor and department. To help you decide on your classes, we have asked every professor teaching a hybrid course to include an explanation of what that means for their class.

 

THEA 101 - Introduction to Theatre
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 11:30am - 12:20pm | In-Person
Professor Orenstein

 

 

Study of elements of theatre arts-acting, directing, playwriting, design-from standpoints of both viewer and participant.

 

THEA 161 - Acting I
Section 1 | Tueday, Friday 4:00pm -  5:15pm | In-Person
Professor Cusick

 

 

Exploration of the fundamentals of acting technique through exercises and improvisation.

 

THEA 161 - Acting 1: Basic Acting Techniques
Section 2 | Monday, Thursday 1:00pm - 2:15pm | In-Person
Professor Holder

 

 

This will be an introductory course that explores the fundamental elements of acting. The mission of this course is to awaken the emotional, imaginative, and transformative powers in each of us. We will explore what it means to really be a storyteller through plays, recommended texts, improvisation, scene work, and monologues. Each student will explore harnessing their own personal experiences (sense memory), to help inform their acting. Finally, this course will enhance the actor's ability to channel "self" (body, mind, and experience), through one’s acting in a TRUTHFUL and believable way; pushing each student’s willingness, readiness, and resilience to transform the "self" beyond its pre-established boundaries.

 

THEA 161 - Acting 1: Basic Acting Techniques
Section 3 | Monday, Thursday 11:30pm - 12:45pm | In-Person
Professor Romano

 

 

The goal of this course is to provide students with the fundamental skills used in the craft of Acting. Students will learn and develop practical skills and basic acting techniques to use in the rehearsal room. Through Improvisation, Text Analysis, Voice and Movement exercises and an introduction to basic techniques this course will focus on the Actor as a storyteller.

 

THEA 161 - Acting 1: Basic Acting Techniques
Section 4 | Tuesday, Friday 1:00pm - 2:15pm | In-Person
Professor Moore

 

 

Exploration of the fundamentals of acting technique through exercises and improvisation.

 

THEA 161 - Acting 1: Basic Acting Techniques
Section 5 | Tuesday, Friday 11:30am - 12:45pm | In-Person
Professor Cusick

 

 

Exploration of the fundamentals of acting technique through exercises and improvisation.

 

THEA 161 - Acting 1: Basic Acting Techniques
Section 6 | Monday, Thursday 11:30am - 12:45pm | In-Person
Professor Holder

 

 

This will be an introductory course that explores the fundamental elements of acting. The mission of this course is to awaken the emotional, imaginative, and transformative powers in each of us. We will explore what it means to really be a storyteller through plays, recommended texts, improvisation, scene work, and monologues. Each student will explore harnessing their own personal experiences (sense memory), to help inform their acting. Finally, this course will enhance the actor's ability to channel "self" (body, mind, and experience), through one’s acting in a TRUTHFUL and believable way; pushing each student’s willingness, readiness, and resilience to transform the "self" beyond its pre-established boundaries.

 

THEA 211 - World Theatre I
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 10:00am - 11:15am | In-Person
Professor TBD

 

 

Survey of international theatre from its pre-Greek origins to the Spanish Golden Age.

 

THEA 212 - World Theatre II
Section 1 | Tuesday, Friday 10:00am - 11:15am | In-Person
Professor Neff

 

THEA 213 - World Theatre III
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 10:00am - 11:15pm | In-Person
Professor Cedars

 

This course introduces and examines a selection of plays and performance styles from various parts of the world during the period between 1850 and present day. Through a study of dramatic works, critical texts, and historical contexts, we will explore the intersection between the performing arts and the changing world around them. The course will illustrate how global developments inspired theatremakers to respond to the periods of modernism and beyond. Classes will NOT be recorded.

 

THEA 214 - Multicultural Perspectics in Theatre
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 11:30am - 12:45pm | In-Person
Professor Chang

 

 

This course introduces and examines the theatres of African, Latin/Hispanic, Asian, and Native
Americans. We will study their histories and dramatic works in order to explore the thematic and
performing characteristics of the studied theatres and their relations to the immediate cultural,
social, political, and economic contexts. The goals are to acquire better understanding of the
theatres and to inspire both creative and scholarly interest.

 
 

THEA 251 - Theatre Production
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 1:30pm - 3:20pm | In-Person
Professor Krumholz

 

 

This course introduces students to the practical aspects of theatre production through a combination of readings, discussions, guests, and hands-on experience. Students learn what goes into making a play from the perspective of the producer, from auditions and casting to budgeting and hiring personnel to marketing, teching, and presenting the final production. Class meetings will include lectures, discussions, and visits from Theatre Department faculty, staff, and student guests.

 

A primary component of this class is that we are responsible for making sure that the departmental production is of the highest artistic quality, is ready on time, and runs smoothly. To this end, students in this class will participate in set construction in our scenic shop, costume construction in our costume shop, and other behind the scenes work in the Loewe Theatre.

THEA 261 - Acting II: American Realism
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 2:30pm - 4:30pm | In-Person
Professor Felner

 

 

Fundamentals of scene study focusing on text analysis, personalization, objective and action using American realism.

 

THEA 262 - Acting III: World Realism
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 2:30pm - 4:30pm | In-Person
Professor Bosch

 

 

Scene study from the world realistic repertory.

 

THEA 263 - Basic Voice & Movement
Section 1 | Tuesday, Friday 10:00am - 11:15am | In-Person
Professor Moore

 

 

This course helps the performer develop authority, range, and freedom in their artistic work. Using the Linklater approach, students learn how to release physical tensions and integrate their body, voice and creativity through exercises. Through text work students will develop their creative imagination and sharpen their articulation. By the end of this course students will have gained more artistic confidence and connection, and leave with a physical and vocal foundation for their rehearsal and performance work

 
 

THEA 281 - Visual Elements of Theatre
Section 1 | Monday, Wednesday 4:00pm - 5:15pm | In-Person
Professor Calderon

 

 

Explore the visual storytelling methods, techniques, and tools available to support the playwright’s narrative and the director’s concept for a theatrical production. We will examine the evolution and styles of the stage picture, theatre architecture, music halls and motion picture palaces. We will also address the advent of new visual media, such as digital projection, animation, and its impact on the contemporary audience experience. The class will also attend Broadway Theatre performances.

THEA 297.04 - Computer Aided Design
Section 1 | Wednesday 11:30am - 2:20pm | In-Person
Professor Russo

Computer Aided Design is a course that uses a combination of industry standard computer programs (Vectorworks, Sketchup, and Photoshop) to aid in the creation, modification, analysis, and communication of a design. This course will be focused through the lens of a theatrical designer - Scenic, Costume, Lighting, or Technical - to produce draftings, 3D models, renderings, and graphic designs. Today, much of the theater design industry operates in the digital workspace, so if you’re looking to pursue a career in theater design, this course will support you building a hirable skillset.

 

THEA 321 - Play Analysis
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 11:30am - 12:45pm | In-Person
Professor Foglia

 

How does a director read a play? What about a designer? Or an actor? How do you get from. text on the page to life on the stage? What does any of this have to do with a directorial "concept"? In this course, we will study plays both classical and modern and employ a variety of lenses to discover the reality these writers have created. The goal is to answer the questions we would face as artists en route to production.

 

Class will be discussion-based and involve close readings of plays and additional texts by thinkers whose ideas we may find useful in approaching those plays. Each week will involve new reading and short assignments designed to test those tools we have acquired. The course requires continuous engagement from students.

 

THEA 365 - Screen Acting
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 10:00am - 11:15am | In-Person
Professor Romano

 

 

The goal of this course is to provide students with fundamental skills used in the craft of Acting for the Camera.

 
 

THEA 371 - Directing
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 5:00pm - 6:50pm | In-Person
Professor Bosch

 

 

This is an intensive laboratory course in directing for the stage.  We will discuss the history of directing and work on text analysis, principles of staging, picturization, rhythm, working with actors and designers and rehearsing a play.  We will discuss and practice the basic technique elements that are necessary for the director.  We will investigate how to have successful collaborations with all members of the production team.  The specifics of organizing your rehearsal calendar – from auditions, to run-throughs, technical rehearsals, etc. will be investigated.

THEA 372 - Directing II
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 5:00pm - 6:50pm | In-Person
Professor Bosch

 

 

This is an intensive laboratory course in directing for the stage.  We will discuss the history of directing and work on text analysis, principles of staging, picturization, rhythm, working with actors and designers and rehearsing a play.  We will discuss and practice the basic technique elements that are necessary for the director.  We will investigate how to have successful collaborations with all members of the production team.  The specifics of organizing your rehearsal calendar – from auditions, to run-throughs, technical rehearsals, etc. will be investigated.

 

THEA 376 - Playwriting I
Section 1 | Monday, Friday 4:00pm - 5:15pm | In-Person
Professor Rubenstein

 

 

In this course, you will study the craft and art of playwriting. You will experiment with process. You will explore what a play can be and what it can mean to write a play.

By the end of the course, you will have read a number of plays, along with essays on playwriting. You will have written several scenes, short plays, and a one-act play. You will have analyzed a number of plays, including those of your peers, and will have gained tools to effectively revise your work.

The goal of the class is not to write a “perfect” play but to turn out some glorious failures, sharpen your instincts, and hone in on your own interests as a writer of dramatic texts.

 

THEA 377 - Playwriting II
Section 1 | Monday, Friday 4:00pm - 5:15pm | In-Person
Professor Hoon

 

 

In this course, you will continue to study the craft of playwriting toward the goal of completing the first draft of a full-length play. Throughout the semester we will workshop each other’s plays at various stages, do writing exercises to ignite inspiration, and examine plays with a wide range of styles, structures, and forms. Later in the semester, we will also get into larger questions about how to utilize feedback from others and how to start a career in theater out of school.

 

THEA 397 - Studies in Theatre:
Latin American and US Latinx Theatre and Performance

Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 10:00am - 11:15pm | In-Person
Professor Litvan

 

This course studies contemporary Latin American and US Latinx theatre and performance. Through the analysis of a wide range of performance practices, including cabaret, street performance, ritual, collective theatre, and the work of individual artists, we will look at how identity is claimed and questioned differently in the two hemispheres. We will also examine how theatre and performance are used to move from the personal to the collective to promote group consciousness and serve as vehicles for social and political change. 

 

THEA 397.21 - Character Body & Speech for the Actor
Section 1 | Tuesday, Friday 11:30am - 12:45pm | In-Person
Professor Moore

 

This course continues the development of the first semester Basic Voice and Movement, andintroduces: Phonetics; Upper resonators; Bridgmont technique action on  speech; Levels of tension for physical work on character and action.

By the end of the semester the student will:

  • Increase the range, clarity, and power of their voice

  • Be able to communicate the rhetoric and action of a text through speech and movement

  • Know how to use the International Phonetics Alphabet for transcription and performance of the sounds of speech

  • Develop physical skills necessary for the development of character

 

THEA 397.26 - Embodying Shakespeare
Section 1 | Monday, Thursday 1:00pm - 2:15pm | In-Person
Professor Felner

 

The heightened language of Shakespeare’s plays requires that the actor’s body meet the text.  This class will explore how the body and voice work together to express poetic imagery.  Actors will learn to search for clues to objectives, actions, and line readings in metrical patterns in blank verse. Using a range of training techniques—among them Rodenburg, Linklater, Chekhov, Lecoq, and Saint-Denis--we will work toward the goal of articulate and integrated physical and vocal expression. 

 

THEA 397.31 - Storytelling in Contemporary Culture
Section 1 | Tuesday 11:30am - 12:15pm | In-Person
Professor Scarfuto

 

From Star Wars to Game of Thrones, the most beloved stories in our culture are rooted in dramatic structures developed by playwrights over the past 2000 years. Explore the profound ways theater history has shaped contemporary storytelling.